What Your Sunglasses Say About You

What Your Sunglasses Say About You
Posted by kkkoo3ko on 2021/08/25
What Your Sunglasses Say About You

    What Your Sunglasses Say About You


    Sunglasses are a real character builder. Or at least they play a large

roll in the character that you play to others. They’re front and center and they can literally change the shape of your

face. So before you buy your next pair of shades, think about what you might be saying to the world.


    With that said, here are some popular sunglass shapes along with what what they might be saying about your

style.


    Sunglasses are one of the world's most ubiquitous fashion accessory, but also play an important part in protecting

our eyes from harmful UV rays. The earliest known use of glasses to protect eyes from the sun was the Inuit use of “sun

goggles” to shield their eyes from the blinding glare of light reflected off the snow. These were made from carved

driftwood, bone, walrus ivory, or caribou antler that formed a strip worn across the eye area, with thin slits that the

wearer could see through. The goggles were cut so that they fit tightly to the face, and often soot or gunpowder was rubbed

on the outside to absorb the light and further cut down on glare. The use of these goggles dates back to around 2,000 years

ago, and as a bonus, even improved the wearers vision as the narrow slits helped focus eyesight.


    unglasses protect your eyes from harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays, reduce eyestrain in bright conditions and protect you

from flying debris and other hazards. Finding the right pair is key to your comfort, whether you’re driving to work or

climbing a mountain.


    All acetate sunglasses offered at REI block 100% of

ultraviolet light. UV protection information should be printed on the hangtag or price sticker of any sunglasses you buy, no

matter where you buy them. If it isn't, find a different pair.

            Types of Sunglasses
       
       
            Casual sunglasses: Best for everyday use and basic recreational activities, casual sunglasses do an excellent job

of shading your eyes from the sun while you drive to work and walk through town. Casual sunglasses are typically not designed

to handle the intensity of action sports.
       
       
            Sport sunglasses: Designed for activities such as running, hiking and biking, sport sunglasses offer light weight

and an excellent fit for fast-paced adventures. High-end frame and lens materials are more impact-resistant and flexible than

casual sunglasses. Sport sunglasses also typically feature grippy nose pads and temple ends, a feature that helps keep the

frames in place even when you're sweating. Some sport sunglasses include interchangeable lenses so you can make

adjustments for different light conditions.
       
       
            Glacier glasses: Glacier glasses are special sunglasses designed specifically to protect your eyes from the

intense light at high altitudes and sunlight reflecting off snow. They often feature wrap-around extensions to block light

from entering at the sides.
 
            Sunglass Lens Features
       
       
            Polarized lenses: Polarized lenses substantially reduce glare. Polarization is a great feature if you enjoy water

sports or are especially sensitive to glare.
       
       
            In some instances, polarized lenses react with the tints in windshields, creating blind spots and diminishing the

visibility of LCD readouts. If this occurs, consider mirrored lenses as a glare-reducing alternative.
       
       
            Photochromic lenses: Photochromic lenses automatically adjust to changing light intensities and conditions. These

lenses actually get darker on bright days, and lighter when conditions get darker.
       
       
            A couple of caveats: The photochromic process takes longer to work in cold conditions, and it doesn't work at

all when driving a car because UVB rays do not penetrate your windshield.
       
       
            Interchangeable lenses: Some sunglass styles come with interchangeable (removable) lenses of different colors.

These multi-lens systems allow you to tailor your eye protection to your activities and conditions. Consider this option if

you need reliable performance in a wide variety of situations.
 
    The benefits of metal sunglasses


    If you prefer to keep it lightweight and classic, you can’t go wrong with sunglasses with metal frames.


    Metal frames are usually relatively thin, making them a great lightweight sunglasses option for everyday wear. Metal is

also durable and resists corrosion. Metal frames also usually are outfitted with nose pads to help keep your sunglasses in

place and prevent slippage (for a more comfortable fit). 


    Metal-frame sunglasses are typically made of aluminum, nickel, titanium or stainless steel, and come in a variety of

styles, from iconic aviators to classic round frames. 


    When shopping for higher-end metal-frame sunglasses, consider aluminum and titanium. They’re both flexible, strong and

corrosion resistant. Titanium sunglasses also are hypoallergenic, making titanium a great choice for those with skin

sensitivities and allergies. 


    Metal sunglasses made from beryllium and stainless

steel are also popular choices, due to their strength and resistance to corrosion. In fact, beryllium is especially

appropriate for those who spend a lot of time in or around salt water and other abrasive environments.


    Do you play sports or wear performance sunglasses? Look for metal sunglasses made with monel or flexon. Both

are exceptionally malleable, and flexon will return to its original shape after twisting or bending. 


    Note that metal sunglasses may not work for lenses that require a strong prescription. Due to their thinner frame

construction, metal frames may be unable to accommodat


    WHAT IS TR90?


    TR-90 Sunglasses has been manufactured using TR90, an

incredible new material that you’re sure to love. So what is TR90?


    TR90 was produced through Swiss technology as a thermoplastic material that is incredibly durable, flexible, and

lightweight. Glasses made with TR90 are extremely comfortable because they have a flexible quality. Since they are flexible,

they can bend under pressure and contour your face comfortably.


    This flexibility also makes TR90 glasses resilient to damage. Because the material is pliable, they are far less likely

to break or bend from impact. If you’re guilty of constantly dropping your glasses, fear not! TR90 frames can prevail!


    Finally, and most remarkable of all, TR90 glasses are supremely lightweight! Even the boldest, biggest styles don’t feel

bulky when made with TR90. The thermoplastic material has a barely-there feel that you truly have to wear to believe.


    How Your Glasses Can Become Your Main Accessory


    PC or CP sunglasses, although they are a necessity

to some, don’t have to be a boring accessory to be stuck with. In 2020, we have seen a rise in popularity of amazing new

glasses of all shapes and sizes. Don’t just stick with your old tired eyewear because you’re used to it; your glasses are

the most noticeable accessory on your body, and they are the first thing people will see when they look at you. So, why not

treat yourself to some cool, fresh glasses to revamp your look? Here is a short guide to help you along the way.


    Before Choosing Glasses


    It is so important to go for regular check-ups with your local eye doctor to see if anything needs changing in your

prescription or if you have any eye health problems that need checking. You should go for an appointment at least

every two years as not only could straining your eyes make your vision worse, it could be causing health problems like

headaches and migraines too. If you have existing health problems with your eyes, you may have to visit slightly more

regularly depending on the advice from your eye doctor.


    Good Quality Frames


    When looking for your next pair of glasses, it is so important to make sure you are

getting some high-quality specs. Don’t be tricked by the price tag, as some extremely cheap glasses may not be very good

quality and may break after a short time of having them. So, it is better to spend a little more to ensure you are getting

the best quality you could possibly get. Sites like artofoptiks.com are experts in eyecare, and a great example of

a supplier of high-quality glasses. There are so many on trend styles to choose from, so don’t limit yourself to basic

frames.


    On Trend Eyewear Styles


    Transparent eyewear is definitely on the rise. Round shaped frames with transparent edging are such great alternatives if

you just don’t like the idea of having a frame color to match your clothes with all the time. On the other hand, slightly

tinted transparent frames are now becoming more and more popular, as they are like a slightly upgraded version of the

clear version, with not so much color poking through, but just enough to give them a quirky edge.


    Geometric glasses are another alternative option shape wise. If you’re bored of the classic round shape, maybe give

these a try as they almost imitate the rounded shape but with a slight edge. You can get all manner of geometric shaped

glasses including square, hexagonal and even octagonal.


    Glasses a new fashion essential?


    Judging from the plethora of eye-catching eyewear that’s been getting face time over the last few years — be it on the

European ready-to-wear runways or in the adjoining office cubicle — it’s clear that glasses have gone from nerd necessity

to chic accessory.


    It’s a shift reflected in the current look-at-me trends — retro, vintage-inspired frames, chunky tortoise shells and

geometric shapes that attract rather than deflect attention — and reinforced by the laundry list of fashion-focused brands

with a presence in the eyewear arena. These include high-end European luxury labels like Prada, Giorgio Armani and Dolce &

Gabbana as well as American contemporary brands Brooks Brothers, Tory Burch, Tiffany & Co. and Sperry Top-Sider, which aims

to translate the brand’s footwear DNA into a line of licensed sunglass and ophthalmic frames due to hit the market next

year.


    While it might seem logical to blame the deteriorating eyesight of the aging baby boomer population or the ever-

increasing computer- and smartphone-induced strain on our collective eyeballs, consumer behavior statistics don’t show a

jump in the number of people who need prescriptions. What they do show, however, is an increase in the number of people who

wear glasses without prescription lenses — presumably to look cool.


    Dorothy Parker famously observed, “Men seldom make passes at girls who wear glasses.” How did we go from that image to

bespectacled bombshells? How did eyewear go from the disguise that turns Superman into his milquetoast alter-ego to an

individual expression of signature style?


    Some in the eyewear industry point to the traditional pop-culture petri dishes of Hollywood celebrity and fashion

runways. “Maybe they’re seeing more celebrities” wearing glasses, said Larry Leight, co-founder and creative director of

boutique brand Oliver Peoples. “And there are more … fashion magazines and runway shows where designers are accessorizing

their shows with ophthalmic glasses — the kind that aren’t sunglasses — with either clear lenses or only slightly tinted

colored lenses.”


    Milena Cavicchioli, vice president of marketing for Luxottica Group — the Milan-based eyewear company that owns Ray-Ban,

Oakley and Oliver Peoples, among others, and which also makes eyewear and sunglasses under license for some 20 fashion labels

— points to the recent Hollywood award show season as evidence. “Think of Meryl Streep on Oscar night,” Cavicchioli said.

“She was wearing beautiful frames. And she’s not the only one. Jennifer Garner and Demi Moore are two I often see in

clippings. When people are looking at [celebrities like] them to see what the latest trends are, them wearing frames is a

huge support and endorsement.”


    She said there have also been other factors at work over the last half decade, including fashion designers’ approach to

eyewear both in the frames that bear their names and in the styled looks that hit the runways during fashion week.


    “The [optical] collections themselves are becoming more elaborate,” she said. “There are some [styles] that are like

jewelry pieces, that make a big fashion statement — like Prada’s Baroque frame, for example. The collections are being

treated in a more fashion-forward way.”



    Fashion designers have realized just how powerful a brand extension eyewear can be, especially in comparison to some

other offshoots. “It’s difficult for a brand to be visible with a fragrance because you’re the only one who knows what you

’re wearing,” she explained. “But when you wear a pair of blue light

glasses
or optical frames, the brand itself gets exposure in the most prominent way because this is something you wear

on your face. It’s not like a wallet that you put in your bag. I would say that it is as powerful as a [designer hand]bag as

a brand statement, as brand exposure.”


    Not just a powerful statement, but an economical one too, points out David Rose, vice president of design and

manufacturing at Costa Mesa-based Salt Optics. “A few years back, before the economy took a hit, people would spend a lot

more money on their bags and their shoes,” Rose said. “But now eyewear is an accessible way to have a quality accessory.”

Rose also said that switching out the spectacles provides a quick and easy way to create a whole new vibe. “It’s like

getting a haircut — going from [having] long hair to buzzing your head — it really changes your overall look.”


    It’s not just the designers who’ve seen the value of cultivating the eyewear-as-fashion-accessory notion. Cavicchioli

said that over the last five years Luxottica has increased its advertising in fashion magazines and worked to get its brands

noticed by influencers and trendsetters. “We’re using the category to make a statement as well,” she said.


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